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The USDA Is Putting New Warnings Labels on Beef

The USDA Is Putting New Warnings Labels on Beef


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The USDA is putting a new label on beef to warn consumers about mechanically tenderized beef, which can spread E. coli

Wikimedia Commons

Now you’ll have even more information when you go to buy a steak at the grocery store.

The USDA is looking to give even more nutritional information to consumers nowadays. coli and salmonella, which might have increased foodborne pathogens over the past several years.

When the mechanical blades cut into the tenderized meat, they also push in external bacteria. Meat has to be cooked to 145 degrees F or hotter in order to kill off any bacteria, or risk the transfer of E. coli or salmonella. About 11 percent of all beef is mechanically tenderized, which makes the meat less tough and easier to chew, according to CBS.

Now customers will be able to choose on their own, with clear labels, if they’re willing to take the risk of buying beef that could be contaminated with dangerous bacteria.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.


New Warnings On Beef Labels

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – When shopping for steaks for that weekend barbecue or a tenderloin for your next special dinner, there’s now something else to consider besides the cut of beef.

Whether it was mechanically tenderized.

This week new information will begin appearing on the USDA-mandated label as to whether the meat was passed through blades or needles for tenderization, according to CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald.

Mechanically tenderizing meat is nothing new. However fears that the process may transfer pathogens, like E. Coli or salmonella, from one piece of meat to another have been raised over the last couple of years.

Because the blades or needles push into the meat, the bacteria will be inside, which means it will have to be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees to kill it.

The new information on the labels, which may be tucked away in the fine print, is needed because you can tell if the meat was mechanically tenderized just by looking at it.

&ldquoIt doesn&rsquot look any different,&rdquo a spokesman for USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service told Kaiser Health News. &ldquoIt&rsquos not filled with holes from the needle piercings.&rdquo

About 11 percent of all beef sold is mechanically tenderized which breaks down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew. The new labels will affect an estimated 6.2 billion servings of steaks and roasts every year, according to the USDA&rsquos Food Safety and Inspection Service.